Nikon D500 review/>

Nikon D500 review

Although the D7100 was a great camera, suddenly the Nikon D500 was released. I simply had to upgrade again.

The fabled D400 was never released, but this camera was an amazing successor to the D300s (which was discontinued in 2012). It had everything I missed on the D7100:

These were all features available on my last camera in that series, the D200, and really really missed on the D7000 onwards models. They were just too small, and had too few buttons. Diving into menu's is never great when you have to take pictures quickly.

Specifications

Here's some relevant specifications.

FeatureD500Comment
Body typeMid-size SLRYeah. Exact middle of the range.
Max resolution5568 x 3712Lots of pixels ahuh.
Effective pixels21 megapixels3 less than the D7100. Not that you'd notice.
Sensor sizeAPS-C (23.5 x 15.7 mm)So, crop sensor.
ISOISO 100 - 51200 (expandable to 50 - 1640000)Very good sensitivity
Lens mountNikon FLongest running lens mount.
Articulated LCDTiltingSo nice when tripod shooting.
Screen size3.2″Nice and big.
Storage typesSD/SDHC/SDXC (UHS-II compliant) + XQDXQD is too expensive for me. Don't think it will ever go down in price.
USBUSB 3.0 (5 GBit/sec)Superfast. But I plug the SD cards into my computer which is faster.
Weight (inc. batteries)860 gLighter than the D200.
Dimensions147 x 115 x 81 mmExcellent dimensions.
The end-user view of the Nikon D500, with a D100 and D200 in the background.

Who is this camera for?

Anyone being serious about photography, but not having the cash for the Full-frame ecosystem, or simply not willing to carry around that much weight. I hope one day to get into bird photography. This camera would be the perfect platform as it balances out the heavier lenses, as well as giving you all the manual controls you need.

At the time I bought this camera, I was seriously considering upgrading to a Full-frame sensor camera like the D750, but quickly realised the cost of that move would be quite prohibitive. DX is a fine format, especially considering my library of lenses. Since I'm not making any money of this hobby, that kind of investment makes absolutely no sense. But maybe. When I finally find a way to monetise my hobby, we'll have to revisit this.

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